Consumers

Psychology Information Online Homepage

Children Homepage

National Directory of Psychologists - Locate a Local Psychologist

Articles by Psychologists

Forensic Psychology

Subject Index of Topics

What is a Psychologist?

How to Select a Psychologist

Information About Psychological Problems

Information About Psychological Treatment

Psychology Bookstore

Frequently Asked Questions about Psychology

Professionals

List your practice in the National Directory of Psychologists

Publish Articles Online

Locate Continuing Education Programs

Psychology Jobs

Market Your Practice

Professional Resource Directory

Students

Psychology Careers

Graduate Education

Licensing Information

Types of Depression

Depressive disorders come in different forms. There are several different diagnoses for depression, mostly determined by the intensity of the symptoms, the duration of the symptoms, and the specific cause of the symptoms, if that is known.

Psychology Information Online provides information on the following depressive disorders. Follow the title link for more information about each type of depression:

  • Major Depression - This is the most serious type of depression, in terms of number of symptoms and severity of symptoms, but there are significant individual differences in the symptoms and severity. You do not need to feel suicidal to have a major depression, and you do not need to have a history of hospitalizations either, although both of these factors are present in some people with major depression. There is no official diagnosis of "moderate depression."
  • Dysthymic Disorder - This refers to a low to moderate level of depression that persists for at least two years, and often longer. While the symptoms are not as severe as a major depression, they are more enduring and resistant to treatment. Some people with dysthymia develop a major depression at some time during the course of their depression.
  • Unspecified Depression - This category is used to help researchers who are studying other specific types of depression, and do not want their data confounded with marginal diagnoses. It includes people with a serious depression, but not quite severe enough to have a diagnosis of a major depression. It also includes people with chronic, moderate depression, which has not been present long enough for a diagnosis of a Dysthymic disorder. (You get the idea!)
  • Adjustment Disorder, with Depression - This category describes depression that occurs in response to a major life stressor or crisis.
  • Bipolar Depression - This type includes both high and low mood swings, as well as a variety of other significant symptoms not present in other depressions.

More Information About Depression